Second Lieutenant 

John Cooper Stedman Lumsden Jr.

 

Basic Information

Name
John Cooper Stedman Lumsden Jr.
Birth
23 Nov 1877
Raleigh, NC
Death
28 Jul 1918
Picardie, France
Time In Service
From: 1898
To: 16 Aug 1918

Service Record

War
Spanish-American War, World War I
Battle(s)
Chateau-Thierry

Honors & Awards

Award(s)
NCSU - Bell Tower
Croix de Guerre

AMC_Roll_Archive_Record

Agricultural Mechanical College Roll Book. NCSU Archive.
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

AMC_Roll_Freshmen_1898_1

AMC Freshmen Roll for 1898. Date of Entrance: 7 Sep 1895 Age: '77 Nov 23 Name: John Cooper Stedman Lumsden Jr. Father: Chas. F. Lumsden Roll: #55 Post Office: Raleigh County: Wake Kind: Pay Father's Occupation: Tin Roofer Preparing School: Morson Dixon, Raleigh NCSU Archive.
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

Private in the 1st North Carolina Volunteer Infantry Band

Cuban Occupation Force.

1st NC Volunteer Infantry

Band:

...

John C. S. Lumsden Jr, Pvt., Raleigh, N.C.,

http://www.spanamwar.com/1stnorthcarolinaroster.html

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NCSU_Thompson added this on 6 Jun 2013

Decendants of John Lumsden - VA/NC

John Cooper Stedman Lumsden. He was born in January 1878. He had a very colorful life and went to New York as an inventor. He shot a Broker named Suynam, and there is extensive information regarding his trial in the New York Times. The mayor of Raleigh, the police chief and the Governor all sent their condolences and served as character witnesses. He did eventually get out of his sentence on a technicality, and served in WWI. He was married to Caroline Miller, per information in the NYTimes, but he did not have children. He was shot down by the Bosch in a dogfight and received the Croix de Guerre. My father, John Cooper Lumsden Jr. has the original medal, and my uncle, James Douglas Lumsden has the original Certificate. His death was on 28 July 1918. He was a Second Lieutenant in the 12th Aero Squadron, US Army and he is buried in Oise-Aisne Cemetery, Plot B, Row 8, Grave 27 per the WWI Honor Roll. Per my grandfather, John Cooper Lumsden Sr., the pilot of the plane lived, returned to the US and corresponded with Little Mama. He also noted that his wife visited the grave in France.

Info from Anne Marie Lumsden Ellis.

http://genforum.genealogy.com/lumsden/messages/566.html

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NCSU_Thompson added this on 7 Jun 2013

CroixDeGuerre_Citation_2

Citation A L'Ordre de L'Armee
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

NARA Photo and Film Clip

Over the Front Volume 3:

Capt. Elliot P. Hinds (left), 45-year-old pilot, and 2/Lt. John C. Lumsden, 42-year-old observer, in front of their A.R. 1, 12th Aero Squadron, Ourches, France, 19 May 1918. Reportedly the oldest flying team in France, Hinds was killed in a crash at the First Air Depot while picking up a a Salmson on 24 June 1918, and Lumsden was killed in action on 28 July 1918. (National Archives No. 111-SC-12486)

http://bit.ly/12geJ7z

http://research.archives.gov/description/66118

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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

AMC_Roll_Archive_Cover

Agricultural Mechanical College Roll Book. NCSU Archive.
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

2nd Lt Cooper Lumsden- standing

North Carolina archives :N_97_4_339
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 26 Aug 2012

2nd Lt Cooper Lumsden- headshot

2nd Lt Cooper Lumsden North Carolina archives :N_97_4_341
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 26 Aug 2012

2nd Lt Cooper Lumsden in coat

North Carolina archives :N_97_4_340
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 17 Mar 2010

Clipping_Unknown_2

Lt. John Lumsden Killed in France Lt. John Lumsden, son of Mrs. C. F. Lumsden, off 1415 Hillsborough Road, was killed in action in France on August 16. Mrs. Lumsden received notice of his death yesterday. He was an aviator and enlisted at Birmingham, Ala. He began active service in France last December and had been at the front most of the time since until his death. He was the second Raleigh aviator to die in the service, the other being Djalma Marshburn. He has two brothers in the service, William B. and Charles Lumsden. No details of his death have been received here, but only the mere announcement from the War Department that he was killed in action. There had been a former report that he was missing in action. He had not long before his death been recommended for promotion. Source is likely a clipping from the News and Observer. NCSU Alumni Archive.
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

News_Observer_1918_Unknown

Another Raleigh Airman Gives His Life In France John Lumsden, a Raleigh boy in the army aviation service as observer and machine gunner, was killed in action on August 7 during a flight over the front lines in France, according to official information received yesterday by his mother in this city. No details of his death were given, only that he gave his life while on observation duty over the lines. Mr. Lumsden was the son of Mrs. C. F. Lumsden, of 1415 Hillsboro Road, and enlisted in the Aviation Corps of the army in Birmingham, Ala., where he was employed. He began active service in France some time last December. Letters from him to his mother since that time have given interesting particulars of his work, which involved several flights each day. One of his last letters told of the death of his pilot during a trip over the lines when Mr. Lumsden in Paris on a day's leave of absence. It was shortly after writing this letter that he met his death. Mr. Lumsden is the second...
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

While at NCSU

Graduated class of 1898.

 

http://www.archive.org/stream/agromeck1919nort#page/n16/mode/1up

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NCSU_Thompson added this on 26 Aug 2012

Cross & Cockade Journal (US), Vol. 9, No. 2

In the late afternoon of 28 July, Lt. Thompson and his pilot, Lt. John Miller, were sent on an artillery spotting mission. A second Salmson A2A, flown by Lt. Alfred Baker with Lt. John Lumsden as gunner/observer accompanied Miller and Thompson as an escort. Flying under cloud cover at 800 feet, Miller and Thompson were attacked by a string of four Fokker D.VIIs, generally Olive Drab in color, that dove on them from behind. The first two Fokkers were apparently hit, and could not pull out of their dives, but the third Fokker scored a hit that disabled Thompson's gun. Miller tried to dive away for home, jinking violently to evade the two Fokkers that follwed them down, firing continuously. At some point, both Miller and Thompson were wounded. Their flight ended in a crash landing by the bank of the river Ourcq. Miller's wound proved fatal, but Thompson was able to make his way to the dressing station after reporting his observations to Lt. Col. W. E. Bare of the 167th Infantry Regimen...   [ Read more » ]

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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

AlumniNews_1919_May_p6_1

Official: E.A. Jeunnet, Lt. Col. Inf. U.S. Adjutant. John C. S. Lumsden, '98 Copy of a report given to the chief of the air service of the American Expeditionary Force by Alfred D. Baker, pilot of a machine shot down in Germany July 28, 1918, in which observer 2nd Lieut. John C. S. Lumsden of Raleigh was killed has been received by Lieutenant Lumsden's relatives here. The report tells in simple language the story of the Raleigh man's gallantry in the air just preceding his death. "In making my report submitted herewith" the statement reads, "I cannot but report the following in regard to my observer 2nd Lieut. John C. S. Lumsden, F. A., who was killed during the flight. The enemy planes where diving on us from above, behind... NCSU Alumni Archive.
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

AlumniNews_1919_May_p6_2

from each side. Three times during the flight I watched and saw Lumsden stop firing at enemies who were diving on our side and at us in order to swing his guns to the other side and shoot at the enemy, who was divining from the other side on the machine which it was our mission to protect. Thus he left himself absolutely exposed and unprotected from the fire of the machine which was attacking us, in order to keep the enemy from the machine which was performing the observation mission and which we were assigned to protect. It was the third time he had done this, and while he was thus fearlessly and purposely exposing himself to dangerous fire that the bullets from the enemy who was attacking us struck him, one passing directly through his head from temple to temple. I saw him fall into the cockpit and knew that he was hit, but did not know where, or whether killed or not, until after I landed. Being the only living witness to this act of heroism, I consider it my duty to those who may ...
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

AerialAgeWeekly_1919_May_5_pg410

Additional Honors Win In the Air by Americans ... Croix de Guerre ... 2nd Lieut. John C. Lumsden ..... Wilson, N.C.
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

Clipping_Unknown_1

Tells of Heroism of Lt. Lumsden -- Pilot Alfred B. Baker Relates Story of His Death in Action -- Exposed himself to perform duty ... See text in Alumni News ... Source is likely a clipping from the News and Observer. NCSU Alumni Archive.
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 5 Jul 2013

Croix de Guerre citation

Croix de Guerre Citiation verbiage. We have the original North Carolina archives :N_97_4_342
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 23 Mar 2010

Grave_1

John Cooper Lumsden 2 Lieut. 12 Aero Sqdn North Carolina July 28, 1918 FR.C. DE G. Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial. Courtesy Find A Grave user soilsister.
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NCSU_Thompson added this on 29 May 2014
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